The Case of Baby M and the Ethics of Surrogacy

THE FACTS OF THE CASE: Elizabeth Stern was not infertile, but had multiple sclerosis and she and her husband William Stern were worried about the potential health implications of pregnancy, including temporary paralysis, and transmitting genes that might put a child who shared them at risk of developing the same illness. The Sterns and Mary Beth... Continue Reading →

The Queen vs. Dudley and Stephens

THE FACTS OF THE CASE: The English yacht Mignonette was a 52-foot cruiser built in 1867. In 1883, Australian lawyer John Henry Want paid a crew to sail it from England to Australia. Due to the nature of the journey, the yacht was not suited for the high seas, so a crew was hard to... Continue Reading →

At the Door: Deontology and Duty

When asked “what would you do?” when the Gestapo is at the door asking if you are harboring any Jews, the answer is actually a simple ethical answer to a simple ethical question (Paul and Elder, 25). Lie! Lie to the officer, slam the door and go enjoy some lekach with your new Jewish friends.... Continue Reading →

Integration in Conflict Resolution

In a fascinating research paper coming out of Lithuania, the authors Kristina Kersive and Asta Savaneviciene use several researched conclusions regarding organizational competence formation and management. This compilation of scientific studies focus on cross-cultural management to lead managers to a better understanding of cross-cultural integration. This integration of the organizational culture and the culture of... Continue Reading →

The Trolly Problem

The Trolley Problem is a (now) classic problem that forces people to make a serious moral decision. The general format of the problem is as follows:  You are alone at the controls of a runaway trolley barreling toward five people who would most certainly die. The brakes and controls (horn, doors, etc) do not work... Continue Reading →

Brod’s Dilemma

It was Summer 1924, and Max Brod was in Franz Kafka’s office. Kafka died of tuberculosis in Austria leaving his dear friend, Brod, two written requests. Brod sat down at Kafka’s paper strewn desk, moving stacks of writings to make room. The first note, undated written in pen read:  Dearest Max, My last request: Everything... Continue Reading →

The Social Contract – a Solution for Inequality

“Man is born free, and he is everywhere in chains” Jean-Jacques Rousseau There are many issues plaguing modern society and, as throughout history, thinkers often ponder and debate solutions. They may treat each issue in isolation, but problems often have common roots in inequality which can be treated collectively with what Enlightenment philosophers call a... Continue Reading →

The Thomas Jefferson Series

[NOTE: On my old blog I wrote a series on Thomas Jefferson regarding hatred toward him, his views on slavery and religion, and the Sally Hemmings scandal. The goal was to address misinformation about the best most intelligent United States President. Here is the series in full - C.B. Scott] The stereotypical god-like praise for... Continue Reading →

The Jedi Legacy

Having been a big Star Wars fan (movies and the now obsolete extended universe, of course), I kept finding deep anti-democratic, anti-liberty, anti-individualist sentiment within the Jedi order – I saw this attitude so often within the original, prequel, and books, it seems almost like a theme for the Jedi. When one sees the immoral,... Continue Reading →

The Mind of the Market [Book Review]

As I was finishing The Mind of the Market by Michael Shermer (of which I have a signed copy), I was having a discussion with a fellow business major. This hard-headed, toddler-like buffoon was no stranger to less than critical thinking – but since he asked about the book I was reading, I told him.... Continue Reading →

Thomas Paine: The Original Emancipator

"There's no real memorial to him in his country of birth. There's no day that honors him. He's not taught in schools. There's no real memorial to him in his country of adoption tough he is really the unofficial founding father and, undoubtedly, the moral author of the Declaration of Independence" - Christopher Hitchens in... Continue Reading →

The Lasting Legacy of our Founding Father’s Failure

The principles laid down in America’s founding was a product of the Enlightenment Era and focused on scientific inquiry, individuality, and of course liberty. But the failing in the application of the America’s founding principles of liberty did not grant minorities the same rights. Though the founding fathers understood the importance of individual liberty, they... Continue Reading →

Comparative Public Administration

As with any field of study, there needs to be defined and uniform standards with which to research and expand the realm of knowledge of the field. The same is true for the field of public administration. But, it is often argued, that because public administration is arguably in its infancy, it lacks a uniform... Continue Reading →

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